AN AMORAL ALTERNATIVE: POLITICAL CORRECTNESS

“We have no government armed with powers capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion.” John Adams continued, “Avarice, ambition, revenge or gallantry would break the strongest cords of our Constitution as a whale goes through a net.” Concluding, the 2nd President of the United States stressed, “Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.”[1]

 

“Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.”[2] However, there “… is now no recognized moral knowledge upon which projects of fostering moral development could be based.”[3]

Virtue (moral integrity) and faith (Religious Liberty) — both of which are absolutely necessary for sustainable freedom in America’s free democratic republic,[4] have been sacrificed on the pagan altar of “political correctness.”

Political correctness is an amoral substitute for moral knowledge. Political correctness erases the line between good and evil in each of us; everyone is now free to determine what is “the good” for themselves and all other ways of seeing things are excluded as intolerant and extremist especially, conscience-based differences (“Religious Liberty”) which are now seen as bigoted, hateful and dangerous.

Ironically, although founded on personal autonomy (lit., “self-law”), political correctness is really a diabolical form of social control that seeks to justify our vindictive attitudes (and too often acts of vengeance) by conforming the divine law to political ends. Consequently, political correctness creates a hostile social environment in which people untiringly strive to be on the side of the “tolerant” and avoid the career ending, socially alienating and personal disgrace of being labeled “intolerant.” Political correctness is an amoral self-regarding “ethic” that reduces human virtue to base level narcissistic ambition.

The “whale” has broken-through the “strongest cords of our Constitution” —The “unbridled passions” of our lawless culture now fuel the celebration of the deliberate perversion of the created order (cf., Romans 1:18-32); and conversely, that which was formerly celebrated, our nation’s religious freedom, in now condemned. 

A specific example of the condemnation of “our nation’s religious freedom” is contained in a report in which the United States Commission on Civil Rights forcibly confronts the First Amendment’s right to “free exercise” by re-framing the Christian faith as an insidious political ideology: “The phrases ‘religious liberty’ and ‘religious freedom’ will stand for nothing except hypocrisy so long as they remain code words for discrimination, intolerance, racism, sexism, homophobia, Islamophobia, Christian supremacy or any form of intolerance.”[5]

In the spirit of political correctness, Martin Castro, the chairman of the commission, unequivocally proclaims: “Religious liberty was never intended to give one religion dominion over other religions, or a veto power over the civil rights and civil liberties of others. However, today, as in the past, religion is being used as both a weapon and a shield by those seeking to deny others equality.”[6]

Castro concludes with the need to eradicate the nation’s real perceived enemy— “religion,” or more specifically, “Christian supremacy”: “This generation of Americans must stand up and speak out to ensure that religion never again be twisted to deny others the full promise of America.”[7]

Contrary to the twisted “politically correct” redefinition of historic Christian faith as oppressive “religious dominion” and politically-motivated “Christian supremacy,” the Gospel reveals Christ’s atoning death for his enemies: He forgives them instead of conquering them; he gives up power and becomes a servant— Christ’s death is revealed in the New Testament as God’s counter-ideological confrontation of the world and its bloodstained history— Religious or political oppression are associated with the perversion of the created order, that is, evil, in God’s world.                 

As fallen men are “given over” (re: Rom. 1:24; 26; 28) to their “unbridled passions” to do as they desire, our free democratic republic will inevitably “die by suicide.”[8]

[1]  John Adams, “Address to the Military,” 11 October 1798, in William J. Federer, America’s God and Country: Encyclopedia of Quotations (Coppell, Tex.: Fame Publishing, 1994), 10. My quote taken from: Os Guinness, A Free People’s Suicide, Sustainable Freedom and the American Future (Downers Grove, IL.: Inter-Varsity Press, 2012), 117.

[2]  John Adams, “Address to the Military,” 11 October 1798, in William J. Federer, America’s God and Country: Encyclopedia of Quotations (Coppell, Tex.: Fame Publishing, 1994), 10. My quote taken from: Os Guinness, A Free People’s Suicide, Sustainable Freedom and the American Future (Downers Grove, IL.: Inter-Varsity Press, 2012), 117.

[3]  Dallas Willard, Divine Conspiracy, Rediscovering our Hidden Life in God (San Francisco, CA: Harper, 1997), 3.  

[4]  Os Guinness, The Case for Civility, 124.

[5]  Martin Castro, Chairman of the United States Commission on Civil Rights (http://www.usccr.gov/about/commissioners.php); “Civil Rights Commission: ‘Religious Liberty,’ ‘Religious Freedom’ Code Words for Intolerance, Homophobia, and ‘Christian Supremacy,’  http://www.cnsnews.com/print/1261746, page 1 of 2, Downloaded: 10/11/2016.

[6]  Ibid.

[7]  Ibid.

[8]  In 1838 Abraham Lincoln exposed the principal threat, at any time in our nation’s history, to our freedom: “At what point then is the approach of danger to be expected? I answer, if it ever reach us, it must spring up among us. It cannot come from abroad. If destruction be our lot, we must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of freemen, we must live through all time, or die by suicide.”  

“Address Before the Young Men’s Lyceum,” Springfield, Illinois, 1838. Quoted in: Os Guinness, A Free People’s Suicide, Sustainable Freedom and the American Future (Downers Grove, IL.: Inter-Varsity Press, 2012), 8.